Archive for the ‘our youth’ Category

Birth-Control Pill Lands Fairfax Student 2-Week Suspension, Possible Expulsion – washingtonpost.com

2009 - 04 - 07

Birth-Control Pill Lands Fairfax Student 2-Week Suspension, Possible Expulsion – washingtonpost.com
When a Fairfax County mother got an urgent call from school last month reporting that her teenage daughter was caught popping a pill at lunchtime, she did not panic. “It was probably her birth-control pill,” she thought. She was right.

Her heart dropped that afternoon in the assistant principals office at Oakton High School when she and her daughter heard the mandatory punishment: A two-week suspension and recommendation for expulsion.

“I realize my daughter broke a rule,” the mother said. But in an appeal to the school system, she reasoned, “the punishment does not fit the crime.”

For two decades, many schools have set zero-tolerance policies on drugs. That means no over-the-counter drugs, no prescription drugs, no pretend drugs in student lockers or pockets. When many teens have ready access to medicine cabinets filled with prescription medications such as Xanax and Vicodin, any capsule or tablet is suspect.

Still, some parents and civil rights advocates say enforcement has been overzealous. Stringent rules have ensnared not only drug dealers and abusers, but a host of sniffling and headachy students seeking quick medical relief. The Supreme Court will consider this month the case of a 13-year-old Arizona student who was strip-searched in 2003 by an administrator who suspected that she was carrying ibuprofen pills.

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3 accused of using Humble corpse’s head to smoke pot

2008 - 05 - 12

The Kingwood teenager’s story of decapitating a corpse and using the head to smoke marijuana was so outlandish that at first Houston Police Department senior police officer Jim Adkins did not believe it.Yet, Kevin Wade Jones Jr., 17, appeared almost indifferent as he relayed the bizarre description of his and two friends’ activities at an Humble area graveyard, Adkins said.”I just doubted it because it’s very morbid, and I couldn’t see anybody doing something like this,” Adkins said Thursday.Not until police went to the home of another Kingwood 17-year-old, Matthew Richard Gonzalez, did the officer believe the tale.”He regurgitated in his plate of food when I asked him about it,” Adkins said. “So I knew there was some truth to the story.”Now, Jones, Gonzalez and a juvenile whose name has not been released are each charged with abuse of a corpse, a misdemeanor. All three were arrested Wednesday night.Police said a fourth suspect is wanted for questioning.Houston police believe the teens disturbed the grave of an 11-year-old boy who died in 1921.

3 accused of using Humble corpse’s head to smoke pot

NYC Teen Tormented Because His Name Is ‘Osama’

2007 - 06 - 13

NYC Teen Tormented Because His Name Is ‘Osama’
NEW YORK The family of a Staten Island teen who says he was constantly harassed in school by his teachers because his name is “Osama” is suing the school system after they say school officials never did anything to prevent the harassment.

His name is — or was — Osama Al-Najjar. Ever since his suicide attempt, he’s called himself “Sam.” His story begins two years ago at Tottenville High School.
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Psych meds drove my son crazy

2007 - 05 - 21

Psych meds drove my son crazy
Until he was 17, my son was unique and funny and odd. He was difficult in some ways but incredibly easy in others. He washed the family’s dishes precisely, went to bed at exactly the same time each night, and sorted our mail into careful piles. He did fairly well in school — above average in math, a little below in social studies — and spent his weekends playing tournament-level chess. He was a loner, but sweet and articulate and very close to his only brother.

Until he was 17, my son was unique and funny and odd. He was difficult in some ways but incredibly easy in others. He washed the family’s dishes precisely, went to bed at exactly the same time each night, and sorted our mail into careful piles. He did fairly well in school — above average in math, a little below in social studies — and spent his weekends playing tournament-level chess. He was a loner, but sweet and articulate and very close to his only brother.

Then junior year came. He met a girl, he went to a dance, he thought life was better. And for a night it was. Then the dance ended, the girl decided she was interested in someone else, and the boy became depressed.

Was this cause for alarm? I thought not. Teenage boys routinely get depressed over girls and fickle friends and school dances. It was painful, but I assumed it would blow over. When it didn’t, after six months, I took him to a psychologist who recommended a psychiatrist who put him on a newfangled antidepressant she said would have the added benefit of controlling some of his obsessive tendencies, like stacking the dishes and sorting the mail.

I didn’t want to control those things — to me, these weren’t symptoms, they were characteristics of my son. And I’d fought for 17 years to keep him drug-free. But the psychiatrist and the psychologist and several family members insisted: He’d become unhappy, his routines were getting in the way of his developing a social life. This pill, they said, would help him.

Instead, he gained 30 pounds and began to lose his mind.

Fattest Child In The World Video

2007 - 05 - 21

Fattest Child In The World Video
She is only seven, and her mom is letting her eat all she wants (a 10000 cals per day diet)

Record payout for bullying victim

2007 - 05 - 15

Record payout for bullying victim
Benjamin Cox, now 18, was teased from the age of five by an older student at his public school, leaving him suffering a range of psychiatric problems and robbing him of his adolescence, the New South Wales Supreme Court was told.

Judge Carolyn Simpson on Monday ruled the school had “grossly failed” its duty of care to Cox, and she ordered the state to award him more than A$213,000 in damages, as well as weekly earnings for life in a payout set to top A$1 million.

The court was told Cox was regularly teased by an older bully and was beaten, and on one occasion, the bully tried to strangle Cox, who fell to the ground unconscious.

His mother, Angela Cox, reported the bullying to the police and to the school, where one teacher said the such incidents were character building, prompting the bully to make a death threat against Cox.

The Farce on the War on Drugs

2007 - 05 - 12

The Farce on the War on Drugs
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The drug war costs American taxpayers $70 billion a year and over the past 35 years, costs approach a trillion dollars. Result? Drugs remain CHEAPER and MORE available than 35 years ago.

“The war on drugs,” said Howard Wooldridge, one of the founders of Law Enforcement Against Prohibition at http://www.leap.cc. “How is that working for us in America? Is it reducing crime? Is it reducing rates of death and disease? Is it effective in keeping drugs and drug dealers away from our children? Is it making America safer and more prosperous? As my profession chases drugs, what are we missing? These are important questions as this prohibition approach costs us taxpayers some 70 billion dollars this year.”
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Juvenile Injustice

2007 - 05 - 11

Juvenile Injustice
The United States made a disastrous miscalculation when it started automatically trying youthful offenders as adults instead of handling them through the juvenile courts. Prosecutors argued that the policy would get violent predators off the streets and deter further crime. But a new federally backed study shows that juveniles who do time as adults later commit more violent crime than those who are handled through the juvenile courts.
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Teenage girls sentenced to life for murder

2007 - 05 - 10

Teenage girls sentenced to life for murder

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“They planned the murder with calmness, consideration, emotional detachment and the desire to have the experience of killing someone,”
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